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What’s the difference between Dry versus and Conventional Laser Imagers

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 Manufacturers are racing to produce the most cost-effective industrial imaging solution for their specific needs. Consider investing in laser imaging systems if you’re looking for lower capital investment and higher return solutions.

Imaging systems help manufacturers digitize 3D objects quicker and more efficiently than ever before. These systems extract information from images that are captured by cameras or sensors, creating digital representations of physical objects. The different types of imager technologies include laser imagers and other camera-based solutions such as conventional cameras, color cameras, and 3D cameras.

These different imaging systems have different pros and cons that can affect your manufacturing process. Let’s take a closer look at the differences between dry-imaging vs. conventional camera imagers.

What are Dry Laser Imagers?

A dry laser imager is a device used in radiology to produce multiple format hard copy radiology images. The dry laser imager works like a photocopier, except that light-sensitive material is used rather than paper to transfer an image.

This type of laser scanner uses infrared light to create a digital image. The main advantage of utilizing this technology is that it gives higher resolution than conventional scanners with water vapor. Moreover, a dry laser scanner can work indoors in environments like laboratories and hospitals where the presence of water creates problems for other types of scanners. Because infrared lasers do not require electricity, they are more cost-effective than devices that need electricity, such as ultrasonic or analog scanners.

What are Conventional Laser Imagers?

Conventional laser imagers produce hard copy imaging by illuminating exposed film sheets with laser light. The images are captured on the film surface and developed in darkness. The process has been discontinued for medical applications.

A conventional printer uses paper to create an image from electrical impulses; in theory, the same concept applies to conventional laser imagers, except rather than paper, it uses film sheets or photographic plates. The difference between both technologies is that the paper-based printer uses ink to transfer the image to paper, while the film sheets or photographic plates are made of light-sensitive material.

What’s the difference between Dry Laser Imagers versus Conventional Laser Imagers?

 Conventional laser imagers use photographic film sheets, while dry laser imagers use special light-sensitive material to obtain the image. The following table compares the two types of devices:

1. The technology used

 Conventional laser imagers use photographic film sheets, while dry laser imagers use light-sensitive material to obtain the image. A conventional printer uses paper to create an image from electrical impulses; in theory, the same concept applies to conventional laser imagers, except rather than paper, it uses film sheets or photographic plates. The difference between both technologies is that the paper-based printer uses ink to transfer the image to paper. At the same time, the film sheets or photographic plates are made of light-sensitive material.

2. Method of capturing the image

Laser Dry imagers emit a focused red light onto a photosensitive material, creating the image. These images are stored in digital format on computer-readable media and can be transferred to a printer or other display.

3. Storage of images

The digital image of a dry laser imager can be saved on memory cards, flash drives, or computer-readable media. The conventional laser imager stores the image on photographic film sheets.

4. Resolution

Dry laser imagers have higher resolution compared to conventional laser imagers.

5. Exposure

Time The exposure time for dry laser imagers is much less than for conventional laser imagers.

6. Film Size

A dry laser imager can create film up to 36 inches in width, while the size of conventional film sheets varies depending on the type of scanner.

7. Light Source

A dry laser imager uses infrared light to illuminate a film surface and create the image. Conventional lasers operate using light like the sun but in a red spectrum.

The wavelength is 660 to 700nm (nanometers). When this red spectrum enters the film, it is converted into black and white images.

Conventional scanners use ultraviolet (UV) light to create images, while dry scanners use infrared light, which is not harmful when focused on paper or film sheets.

What are the Applications of Dry laser imagers?

Dry laser imagers are used in applications like hospitals, clinics, and laboratories to create hard copy images like x-rays, MRI, CT scans, and patient reports. In clinical settings, they are used by radiologists and doctors to obtain images of patients.

They are also used in research facilities where scientists need to scan film sheets or photographic plates.

What are the Applications of Conventional Laser Imagers?

To create hard copy images that replicate a real life scene, conventional laser imagers use film sheets or other photographic plates as the receptive mechanism.

Conventional scanners are used in research facilities where scientists need to scan film sheets or photographic plates.

Which technology is more expensive?

Dry laser imagers are also more expensive than conventional devices because of the higher cost of the light source.

Dry laser imagers use a LED as a light source and battery power, while conventional scanners use batteries and fluorescent lights to create images.

Conclusion

Dry Imagers and conventional cameras are part of a group of imaging technologies with advantages and disadvantages.

Dry laser imagers produce high-quality images at a faster rate than conventional scanners. Dry laser imagers can also be used in medical and research facilities where water creates problems for other devices.

Dry imagers can be used in any inspection applications where the ability to set up a camera quickly and use it is critical. They also allow for in-process inspection, which can make them useful when inspecting products that are still on the assembly line or moving through other processes e.g., robotic welding lines or machinery that works with large objects. This makes dry imagers useful for quality control, research, development, training, and compliance.

Depending on your application, there are advantages and disadvantages to both wet and dry imagers. However, the choice of which type of imager to purchase will largely depend on your budget and needs and the application you are using it for.

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